Blogs



Computable Knowledge has Superpowers!

William Hayes, PhD |
One of the side effects of capturing biological knowledge in a computable language is the ability to transform it into new forms. One of the questions we’ve been asked before about BEL (Biological Expression Language) is whether there are multiple ways to capture the same knowledge. Basically, does BEL force people to capture the same biological relationships in exactly the same way? The short answer is NO. BEL provides a lot of flexibility.
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February 29, 2020 is a Very Rare Day

Judith Gorski, PhD |
In anticipation of #RareDiseaseDay, this past Monday, the FDA held a public meeting to assess current challenges, solutions, commonalities in product development in rare disease research. Rare disease, by definition, affects fewer than 200,000 Americans however, a total estimated 30 million people in the United States are impacted by these rare illnesses. Unfortunately, many of some 7,000 illnesses have no treatment. Here lies the R&D conundrum; small market size of each disease versus the exuberant costs to develop a new drug.
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Biological Knowledge is Everywhere — How Do you Capture it?

Judith Gorski, PhD |
How many of us have purged our offices only to toss hundreds of printed publications with scribbles in the margins and key-thoughts Sharpied®? Today we browse through publications online with our iPhones and iPads, Ctrl-C, Ctrl-V into Notes but still, the words, the conclusions, the novel methods, the hypotheses remain disconnected from one author, one publication to the next. The challenge is taking all that scattered knowledge and building a concise user-friendly network on which you can base your hypothesis.
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BioDati: It’s all about Me and My Heart! Personalized Medicine for Cardiovascular Disease

Judith Gorski, PhD |
By the time it takes to read this blog, 6 people will have died in the US from cardiovascular disease; not only is it deadly, but it’s also expensive — costing the United States about $219 billion [1]. Furthermore, heart disease is the №1 killer of women, killing more women than all forms of cancer combined. Precision medicine (PM) has catapulted yesterday’s cardiovascular research enabling its use in today’s identification of numerous potential targets for drug discovery and development that will work best for specific patients at risk for cardiovascular disease.
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